Laparoscopic Fundoplication

Oesophageal Reflux Surgery (Keyhole Operations)

Anti-reflux surgery is surgery to correct a problem with the muscles at the bottom of the oesophagus (the tube from your mouth to the stomach).

Problems with these muscles allow gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) to happen.

This surgery can also repair a hiatus hernia.

Introduction

GORD is a condition that causes food or stomach acid to come back up from your stomach into your oesophagus. This is called reflux. It can cause heartburn and other uncomfortable symptoms. Reflux occurs if the muscles where the oesophagus meets the stomach do not close tightly enough.

A hiatal hernia occurs when the natural opening in your diaphragm is too large. Your diaphragm is the muscle and tissue layer between your chest and belly. Your stomach may bulge through this large hole into your chest. This bulging is called a hiatal hernia. It may make GORD symptoms worse.

 A procedure called fundoplication is the most common type of anti-reflux surgery. During this procedure, your surgeon will:

  • First repair the hiatal hernia with stitches. The surgeon will tighten the opening in your diaphragm to keep your stomach from bulging through.
  • Your surgeon will then use stitches to wrap the upper part of your stomach around the end of your oesophagus. This creates pressure at the end of your oesophagus and helps prevent stomach acid and food from flowing back up.

Surgery is done while you are under general anesthesia (asleep and pain-free). Surgery usually takes 2 to 3 hours.


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